lab

Beyond

the Anthropocene?

The 17 collages that make up the exhibition are the result of a workshop conducted with the students of the course in Sociology of Culture of the Bachelor of Arts in Political, Social and International Sciences (a.y. 2022/2023).

Through what are referred to in social research as “creative methods,” represented in this case by the collage technique, we concretely experimented with the approach of collective production to cultural meanings.
That is, we created cultural objects from the exploration and re-signification of recurring elements in social space.
The exhibited works propose new frames of meaning to the public around the eco-climatic crisis, inviting them to take a critical look at the culture of the Anthropocene.
Discarded or repurposed materials and fragments of images and texts from mass production have in this process lost their autonomous meaning to acquire a new one, the outcome of a collective process of co-construction, which has led us/them to break down, re-signify and recombine the frames that mainstream media adopt in the narrative of climate change and the broader culture of the Anthropocene.

The students were asked to respond to the same invitation that Cecilia Alemani, curator of the 59th Venice Art Biennale, issued to artists from around the world. Telling the story of the relationship between individuals and technologies, bodies and the Earth, women artists have been questioning around the question “How is the definition of human changing?
In our case, the question that guided the theoretical exploration and artistic process was more like “What kind of world do we live in?“, an exhortation to focus on the different forms of relationship we have with the environment of which we are a part and with all the other beings that inhabit and sustain it. An invitation to visualize the culture of the Anthropocene and the processes that set it up and continue to run through and reproduce it. An invitation, also, to imagine “possible otherwise.”

Despite the differences between the different collages, it is not difficult to identify some common elements. The absolute protagonist of all the works is dualism, the rift. Be it between the past and the future, between technological devastation and a nature to be protected, between a dramatic near future and the hopeful glimmer of change that is still possible. The collages, populated with humans and non-humans in direct relation to each other, exhibit other recurring objects and symbols: clocks, garbage, gas masks, world political leaders, activists/and activists, veils and nets, fossil industries. Thematizing the relationships between systemic changes, individual practices, political choices, and collective actions, they stage the nightmares, crises, and revolutions of our age, as well as the inequalities and forms of oppression that prevent all beings from enjoying an equal right to breathe.

Finally, the works return some considerations: the climate has changed but it has not yet changed us. Students question their own freedom of choice, their own and others’ responsibility, and identify collective action, new policies, and an ecological and ecosystem-based approach to care as some possible ways to move beyond the Anthropocene.

Adam's Creation

Matilde Anania, Leonardo Bech, Sara Borghi, Carlotta Cencic, Eleonora del Nero, Vittoria di Stefano

Starting from Michelangelo’s famous “Creation of Adam, “the work aims to represent the increasingly close relationship between man and technology.
The two index fingers, one robotic and one human, almost touch so as to define a meeting of two worlds now difficult to separate from each other.
The worlds of technology and human beings have never been so in synergy that it would be impossible to imagine our lives without the help of technological development.
Yet, we are also aware of the many negative consequences of introducing the “inhuman” into our daily lives.
The work thus represents what these two worlds, seemingly so distant, but which in reality in the present day could not exist without each other, can generate: on the one hand, the progress and technological development that has enabled humanity to achieve considerable increases in its lifestyle through technological innovations, which allow us a direct and instantaneous connection with everything else in the world; on the other hand, they have brought about the change in the natural balance and the surrounding reality, the effects of which can often be irreparable and indelible.

How to survive?

Martina Bianco, Agata Burgio, Ludovica Carrasi, Maria Comparini, Helena Di Paolo, Alexia Dinescu, Michela Dolci

The work evokes the feeling of fear that prevails when we come to think about an issue as broad, serious and complex as climate change and aims to highlight how this fear leads to a consequent mechanism that makes people perceive the problem as secondary, leading them to ignore it.
The colors are bright, symbolic, and expressive: the yellow background symbolizes the possibility of still finding a solution while red, the predominant color commonly associated with danger and alertness, is an invitation to stop, reflect, and stop ignoring.
Il protagonista dell’opera è l’uomo, spettatore attraverso gli infiniti mezzi comunicativi di cui dispone, ma parallelamente senza occhi, cieco. L’uomo vede quasi ciò che vuole vedere, cerca soluzioni utopiche, lontane, per sopperire alla paura da cui sarebbe pervaso se aprisse gli occhi sulla sua terra.
The work aims to convey the enormous amount of catastrophes the Earth is witnessing, not only environmentally but also socially; thus, a parallel is created between the hope that we can escape them by ignoring them and the intention to do something concrete, to stop and become aware.
The human due to pandemic, climate change, and various catastrophes happening in the world becomes more dependent on the nonhuman relying more and more on technology for its survival. For example, the little hope we subconsciously have for the future leads us to focus on a utopian future such as moving to another planet (in this case Mars) rather than truly embracing radical changes.
The work is meant to evoke a sense of hope in the viewer by inviting reflection on how ignoring the problem even through utopian solutions cannot be a solution.
The work is an invitation to change the system, to open our eyes to what is happening here and now.

Where has hope gone?

Giulia Agugiaro, Ludovica Albano, Thomas Baldiserra, Clara Carrera, Edoardo Cavazzuti, Simone Egitto

The work evokes a sense of disquiet that stems from its maker’s feelings of anguish; images of cataclysms are juxtaposed with images with strong political and social connotations to highlight the strong interdependence between the choices of the body politic and their planetary consequences. On the left side of the work, however, images filtered through green film evoke a feeling of hope and confidence to communicate that climate change can be a resource for a revolution in lives. The alarm clock with the words Listen to Me placed in the foreground along with brown sugar-symbolizing the sand in the hourglass-are there to remind us that time is short and that the time has come to redesign the future.
On the right side, the colors are predominantly somber, conveying a feeling of sadness and anguish: the red with “hate speech” written on it invites the viewer to reflect on the interconnection between hate speech and the policies undertaken on the environment; the dark green symbolizes oil, reminding us of the dependence on fossil fuel; the wire mesh placed on the Venus denounces the deprivation of freedom of an increasingly large part of the population. The left side, on the other hand, is vivid and lit to remind us that there is still time to act and to suggest a feeling of hope.
The work has a strong political connotation and draws attention to the inextricable relationship between the local and the global, inviting the viewer to responsibility and awareness regarding humanity and the nature that surrounds us.
The viewer is asked to write a word or phrase elicited by the collage on a piece of paper and then place it inside the transparent green container to represent the continuity and interdependence between our daily actions and their effects on the future.

And am I supposed to feel guilty about that?

Carlotta Arcostanzo, Valentina Ciardullo, Giulia Ciotti, Giulia De Matteis, Edith Ezukuse

The idea for the work stems from the need to depict the human tendency to accuse others, pointing the finger at institutions and others in the public arena. Given the unrepresentability of climate change and its effects, individuals in society often hide individual responsibility behind the excuse that there is a “shared lifestyle” behind it.
It is through the survival instinct that the individual is able to ignore constant and looming threats, thus seeking refuge from the guilt that slowly wears him or her down. By virtue of this, the phenomenon of climate change still seems remote, makes one feel helpless, and threatens one’s identity and security.
The work was created through images and colors that evoke a sense of distrust, despondency and melancholy. The main subject of the work turns out to be chaos in all its forms, starting from the environment, through politics to industry, the disappearance of natural habitats and the extinction of animal species, urbanization, deforestation, pollution of the seas, waste accumulation, melting ice, conflicts and civil wars, and, finally, health crises.
The global and the local intersect in the work to underscore their inextricable interdependence.
The work engages the viewer through identification and the elicitation of a sense of guilt given by being both responsible and indifferent.

The lungs of the Earth

Carlotta Arcostanzo, Valentina Ciardullo, Giulia Ciotti, Giulia De Matteis, Edith Ezukuse

The idea for the work stems from the need to represent the human tendency to blame others, pointing fingers at institutions and other actors in the public context. Given the unrepresentability of climate change and its effects, individuals in society often hide individual responsibility behind the excuse that there is a “shared way of life” behind it.
It is through the survival instinct that the individual is able to ignore constant and looming threats, thus seeking refuge from the guilt that slowly wears him or her down. By virtue of this, the phenomenon of climate change still seems remote, makes one feel helpless, and threatens one’s identity and security.
The work was created through images and colors that evoke a sense of distrust, despondency and melancholy. The main subject of the work turns out to be chaos in all its forms, starting from the environment, through politics to industry, the disappearance of natural habitats and the extinction of animal species, urbanization, deforestation, pollution of the seas, waste accumulation, melting ice, conflicts and civil wars, and, finally, health crises.
The global and the local intersect in the work to underscore their inextricable interdependence.
The work engages the viewer through identification and the elicitation of a sense of guilt given by being both responsible and indifferent.

Pollutants of the era

Emma Bellan, Federico Blanco, Andrea Carbotti, Ilenia Crivaro, Dalila De Simone

The work evokes contrasting emotions: on one side anger, frustration and despair; on the opposite side hope, lightheartedness and optimism. The materials and colors used draw attention to the contrast of these emotions and are intended to convey the positive and negative sides, in the majority, of the world we are a part of.
The protagonist of the play is man, as the perpetrator and victim of the problems that plague him, but also confident that a better future is coming.
The relationship between the human and the non-human is adversarial, because man is always trying to improve himself and apply innovations to the best of his ability, but these innovations spill over against him. Within the work, the disastrous consequences of man’s wrong decisions are highlighted: riots, pollution, natural disasters, and extinction of animals. The work emotionally engages the viewer through its images that concretize man’s inconsistent and counterproductive attitude.

The factory of unhappiness

Chiara Andreazza, Lucia Ciolino, Ilaria Curti, Alice Diblio

The Unhappiness Factory was created by taking a cue from Jago’s play The First Baby.
The sculpture, depicting a fetus, was made in 2019 and then brought to the International Space Station by Commander Luca Parmitano. The work was immortalized there in an iconic shot, which has Earth as its backdrop.
The First Baby is the “symbol of a new generation born and breathing into the future, as frightening, vast and unknown as the galaxies that make up the universe,” so declares the author.
It is precisely the issue of the younger generation that has become the focus of our project: the fetus becomes a symbol of hope for us. Young people are increasingly aware of climate change and their own role within the organic system of nature. Past generations have lived in an anthropocentric system that has led them, and leads them today, to think they can overcome all natural limits. A conviction that is responsible for industrial development as we know it, with all its distortions: CO2 emissions, unfair exploitation of resources, pollution, waste accumulation, fossil fuel extraction, etc.
Evolution that has led to overcoming even the Earth’s limit, and the shot from the space station is an emblem of that. In the image, the smallness of the fetus in front of the Earth leads us to rethink our relationship with the environment in which we live. Environment that we have made inhospitable and with which it would be necessary to reconcile. Man should no longer overpower and control nature but consider its agentiveness and that of all its parts.
Therefore, we decided to represent the planet as a set of aspects of today’s human life on Earth and its possible negative and positive outcomes. The socioeconomic system in which we are immersed, which conditions our desire for control, condemns us to unhappiness. The only remaining space for action to heal is to take care. Of us, the spaces we inhabit and the species that inhabit them with us. Then again, we still have time.

The permeability of evil

Filippo Accetta, Giulia Bergamini, Maya Berti, Emanuele Bianchi, Matthieu Chiagano, Ilaria del Grande

Beginning with feelings of anguish and fear, the work is realized on two planes: in the background we have a prevalence of somber colors, hinting at the sadness of the situation in which we find ourselves nowadays, while in the foreground there is a human figure characterized by brighter colors, vibrant colors that enhance it and point to it as the main point.
The protagonist of the work is the human figure in the center of which the inscription “optimism” is symbolizing its centrality to change and improved conditions.
The words that dot the work represent the catastrophic register through which climate change is told: environmental disasters, drought, technological murder, thirst, and social distance.
Internally, the human figure is made up of non-human elements and s-objects; externally, on the other hand, the inhuman, destructive of nature and the environment is represented.
The cigarette butt placed on the underside gives off a strong smell of smoke to symbolize the negative aspects of today’s society and is contrasted with the human figure, which instead represents optimism toward the future and the prospect of improvement.

The reality of the world

Alessia Achilli , Salma Alaoui, Gabriele Bartolucci, Lisa Maria Beretta, Chiara Chicconi, Alex Corsi

The work uses the social world to convey the message directly and quickly. Be Real is a social that quickly spread around the world in 2022: once a day a notification reminds all users that they should take a picture, either with the internal or external camera, and then share it with friends. For posting you have 2 minutes but in case you post late, Be Real will show all users the delay made.
The colors and images used follow the logic of the social and the representation it conveys of the world: the quadrant depicting the external camera frames industries, fires, and seas full of garbage; while the one showing the internal camera features a polar bear, i.e., the user who took the photograph to be posted.
Evoking feelings of anger, fear, and disorientation are the landscapes devastated by human action captured by the polar bear with the reactions of “friends” on social included. The climate emergency, depicted through the use of red and black, is flanked by the words “not too late” placed under the user’s name, where within the social would be placed the notice of the delay of posting on Be Real, symbolizing hope in the future and the desire for change.
The two sides of the camera represent the relationship between the human and the non-human, on one side factories and pollution, on the other side animals and the plant kingdom. The depiction of social media within the work intersects the locality and globality of action and gazes.

Life on Mars

Alice Barnabè, Sara Basso, Francesca Bozzi, Aurora Budano, Giorgia Della Maestra

The work, inspired by David Bowie’s Life on Mars, prompts reflection on the possible conditions for the emergence and development of human life on other planets and the sense of imagining life elsewhere when it is still possible to preserve it on planet Earth.
The work evokes, on the one hand, a feeling of hope for the future and confidence in scientific-technological progress and, on the other, a sense of awareness regarding the damage caused by human exploitation of the earth’s resources.
Soliciting these emotions are the smells of spices and herbs: mint, placed on Mars, hints at freshness and hope for new life to which are contrasted by chili peppers and curry whose warm, enveloping smells hint at the overheating of the atmosphere.
The protagonists of the work are on the one hand the planets, Earth and Mars, the former as a place to place less and less hope, the latter as an idealized paradise, and on the other hand the activists and activists who daily take it upon themselves to bring attention to the importance of preserving human life and ecosystems on the planet.

We are the flood and We are the ark

Lorenzo Aiello, Nicolò Andreazza, Francesco Baldini, Leonardo Bellucci, Gabriele Cerrato, Leonardo Conti

Featured in the work is a reimagining of Michelangelo’s “Pieta.” Within the figure of the Madonna we find images that trace the developments of capitalism, from factories to banks, from industries to today’s multinational corporations. On the other hand, the body of Christ symbolizes the consequences that this system of production has brought to the Western world (upper body part) and the Fourth World (lower body part). On one side are depicted the well-being, wealth, prosperity and affluence that cloud part of humanity by deluding it into thinking it is exempt from responsibility for the poverty, misery and hardship that besiege a very large part of the Planet. The dividing white veil represents a transparent curtain that prevents only those who do not want to look from seeing. The figure is elevated because, for a very long time, those countries and social classes most responsible for climate change have underestimated the repercussions of their behavior, coming, perhaps, to become aware of it only in the face of striking and sensationalistic phenomena that reveal the agentiveness of nature. The background, therefore, in the lower part depicts the indirect effects of the Western way of life and the capitalist system of production on the environment and the entire Planet; in the upper part, however, there are images that recall a return to a symbiotic relationship between man and nature, in which man is not at the center but on an equal level with the environment allegorically referring back to the ‘Anthropocene. The suffering Christ represents the relationship between local and global, for while it is clear who benefits and who does not, on a local level, from the continuing evolution of capitalism, the global situation of suffering and need that grips all of society is also indisputable; Our Lady depicts what has generated and caused this situation and what could be the solution, for “We are the flood and We are the ark.”

Preparing for impact

Giulia Bagattini, Chiara Brizzi, Margherita Bruttini, Gabriel Castano, Emilia Del Campo

The work represents the complex system of consequences associated with technological progress. In this dense web, narratives have so far prevailed that render the individual simultaneously guilty and petrified in the face of the enormity of the transformations, unable to act and produce change. In the face of this, the individual role is redefined and an alternative narrative proposed.
The gray net, which partially conceals images of catastrophes, conflicts and exacerbated inequalities, does not completely remove the emergent/apocalyptic paradigm from the collective narrative-so it is not meant to deny the concrete consequences of irresponsible use of technological progress that occurs at the expense of human and nonhuman life-but rather invites a focus on the need to act and think not as an individual, but as a community.
Indeed, the protagonists of the work are precisely the hands, central and colorful against a gray background, and multiple, to emphasize the importance of consciously acting collectively. These hands abandon the self-aggrandizing individualism of the twenty-first century and recognize themselves as part of a global whole, to be protected and privileged above any other goal.
The elements not concealed by the net also include the image of a photovoltaic panel; this choice stems from a desire to deprive the technology of a negative or positive connotation-in fact, we find other examples of modern technologies under the net as well-and to present it rather as a tool that can be wielded by more or less conscious hands.

The students were asked to respond to the same invitation that Cecilia Alemani, curator of the 59th Venice Art Biennale, issued to women artists from around the world. Telling the relationship between individuals and technologies, bodies and the Earth, women artists and men questioned themselves around the question “How is the definition of human changing?
In our case, the question that guided the theoretical exploration and artistic process was more like “What kind of world do we live in?“, an exhortation to focus on the different forms of relationship we have with the environment of which we are a part and with all the other beings that inhabit and sustain it. An invitation to visualize the culture of the Anthropocene and the processes that set it in place and continue to traverse and reproduce it. An invitation, also, to imagine “possible otherwise.”

Here the world ends

Alice Arnaldi, Anna Bertocci, Martina Bergamini, Lisa Del Magno, Francesco Manuel Carlo Dettori, Michele Domenicucci

The work evokes opposing feelings of anguish and hope. Anguish for the situation in which the Planet finds itself, increasingly depicted as being on the verge of collapse, in a vicious circle that resumes the idea of irreparable catastrophe; hope, on the other hand, for what little trust continues to survive in our thoughts.
The work aims to bring back the perception of a generation that perhaps more than any other is influenced by the messages of the media, from television to social media, which hammeringly insist on the emergent and pessimistic frame and certainly do not convey tranquility for the future.
The entire collage, therefore, splits into two parts: the left half referring to the past recalls the emotion of anguish, tension, and disquiet and is represented by the erupting volcano, the car (a symbol of pollution), and Shell gasoline. The second half, on the other hand, takes up the present, as evidenced by the depiction of former U.S. President Trump as he kisses British Prime Minister Johnson. Foundational phrase of the first half is “Here ends the world, shout it if you must…” further emphasizing the feeling of anguish, while that of the second half is “what if the past and the future could meet?” The half concerning the present is more hidden, less perceptible at a first glance: although hope toward the future is still alive, it remains extremely difficult to grasp, obscured by pessimistic messages enveloping our society.
The message of hope intersects with catastrophic imagery to highlight the fallout of past wicked and short-sighted choices on the use of natural resources; choices for which those watching must pay the consequences. The volcano placed on the left restores order by overturning man’s presumption of control over nature, while nature does not bend to human actions.
The work is an invitation to the complex search for hope.

Are we really free to choose?

Veronica Babini, Sofia Bonzagni, Virginia Cibeo, Chiara Colucci

The increasing pervasiveness of technology in our lives triggers opposite feelings in us: optimism and fear. On the one hand, the future looks like a world of possibility and hope. Hope that technology can protect our planet by helping to preserve deserts, mountains and forests. On the other it is dehumanizing, causing destruction and anger. The future looms over us like lava from a volcano, which we are not sure we can tame. In the work, the hopeful future is represented by images of a child playing with a turtle, snow-capped mountains and lush forests. The sphere held in a hand in the lower left expresses the feeling of control that technology gives of the future, and the machine represents progress in its aesthetic and useful sense. The ominous future, on the other hand, is represented by images of war; the turtle standing next to the child in the left end of the work is now replaced by a soldier; the landscape images disappear in a cloud of smoke. A virus is found at the right end of the collage, below a child wearing a mask. Both images allude to the Covid 19 pandemic, which has exacerbated feelings such as fear and isolation.
Two parts of the world are represented in the work, the “more serene” one characterized by the color blue, the starry sky in the background and spectacular landscapes, and by the writing the surprising strength of the weather. On the other side is red, the color symbolizing the anger and disappointment of a world still too divided.
The work consists of a multiplicity of centers that draw the focus of the viewer, urging one to find different meanings hidden behind each image and each inscription. Just as in life every day we are called to live through the different interpretations we give to the world.

We support the future

Edoardo Aulicino, Viola Balaj, Lorenzo Barchesi, Lorenzo Bertuccioli, Anna Bonazza, Sofia Esposito

The work represents the dualism between the human and the non-human, between a sense of alienation and one of belonging to the world around them.
The use of antithetical colors is meant to convey how progressive estrangement from nature is enclosing us in a “cage” that we ourselves create. Only through a radical change in the way we understand what surrounds us will we be able to leave this cage and get to know the beauties of the Planet by making them blossom like the tree that stands behind the gloomy landscape in the foreground.

SunScreen

Edoardo Alfano, Denise Arri, Sofia Barilari, Michela Di Campli, Francesco Collovà, Siria Comisso, Andrea De Luca, Michela Di Campli

In 1922, British poet T.S. Elliot offered his contemporaries a chilling image of a devastated land within his masterpiece The Wasteland:

“What are the roots that grasp, what are the branches that grow
From this rubble of stone? Son of man,
You cannot say, nor can you imagine, because you only know
A heap of shattered images where the sun beats,
And the dead tree gives no shelter, no comfort the screeching of the cricket”

It is from this heap of shattered images of nature and from the stone rubble that towers above and oppresses nature that the work was created. The work evokes a feeling of confusion and disorientation: in the chaos of the modern world, immersed among more or less recent tragedies, and subject to an incredible amount of stimuli, it is increasingly difficult to distinguish the true from the false. Information related to climate change is a very arduous wilderness: the work takes on this complexity by combining fragments from different sources, taking them out of their original context, and placing them within an Instagram page. The stories above show us a series of unreliable sources of information combined with shocking and provocative images designed to frame climate change in a ruthlessly catastrophic frame. This is countered by the large post in the center, which tries to channel attention by combining sensationalism with the scientific. Images that are supposed to capture the attention of the inattentive are covered with headlines of informative articles and scientific research, bringing out the real protagonist of the work: the climate change debate and the discord of positions. The relationship between reality and the individual is irretrievably filtered, but the individual, capable of making “his own story,” is left with the ability to choose and be an active and conscious protagonist. The user and his knowledge are limited to a heap of shattered images, from which it seems nothing can be born. The work therefore aims to give new life to those visual fragments, in the hope that there is more beyond the dead tree and the screeching of the cricket.

Time to change

Gabriella Agyei, Flavia Basagni , Giorgia Boroni, Giulia Bottalico, Giorgia Cancellara, Paola Del Piccolo

The work represents climate change through two perspectives symbolically located at the top and bottom of the paper. The two are joined in the middle by a globe whose clock-shaped southern hemisphere represents the most catastrophic and chaotic aspect of climate change: pollution, capitalism, natural disasters, and forced migration. On the other hand, the upper side symbolizes hope and features the new generations actively mobilizing by calling the attention of governments (who must act) urging an awakening of the conscience of the population that still downplays the problem. The upper side is therefore dedicated to alternative solutions, sustainability and reconnecting humans with nature by recognizing its agency.
Ambivalent feelings are aroused through the work, on the one hand the drama of the current condition and the damage humanity has inflicted on the Earth, and on the other hand hope for the future and a desire to remind people that although it is short, we still have time to act.
The materials and colors used represent these sentiments; in the upper part along with green, blue and white to urge a sense of calm, spices have been used that refer to the importance of Km 0. In the lower part, the somber colors are emphasized by images of scenarios of war, pollution, destruction and industries and the use of plastic materials to remind us that we need to reverse course. The viewer is invited to get in touch with the work by touching and smelling it, especially the frayed string placed between the two hemispheres symbolizes tension: time is short and the thread is about to break, it is time to decide.

Curated by Paola Parmiggiani, Valentina Cappi, Lorenza Villani, Giulia Agugiaro, Gioia Archetti, Giulia Bagattini, Thomas Baldiserra, Veronica Marleen Ballhaus, Emma Bellan, Lisa Maria Beretta, Anna Bertocci, Margherita Bruttini, Gabriel Castano, Lucia Ciolino.

with works created by
Ahmed Aabid, Filippo Accetta, Alessia Achilli, Gabriella Agyei, Giulia Agugiaro, Lorenzo Aiello, Salma Alaoui, Ludovica Albano, Alessia Alberghini, Edoardo Alfano, Matilde Anania, Chiara Andreazza, Nicolò Andreazza, Gioia Archetti, Carlotta Arcostanzo, Alice Arnaldi, Denise Arri, Edoardo Aulicino, Veronica Babini, Giulia Bagattini, Viola Balaj, Francesco Baldini, Thomas Baldiserra, Veronica Ballhaus, Lorenzo Barchesi, Sofia Barilari, Alice Barnabè, Gabriele Bartolucci, Flavia Basagni, Sara Basso, Leonardo Bech, Emma Bellan, Leonardo Bellucci, Giulia Bergamini, Lisa Maria Beretta, Martina Bergamini, Maya Berti, Anna Bertocci, Lorenzo Bertuccioli, Emanuele Bianchi, Martina Bianco, Federico Blanco, Anna Bonazza, Sofia Bonzagni, Sara Borghi, Giorgia Boroni, Giulia Bottalico, Sofia Bottazzi, Francesca Bozzi, Chiara Brizzi, Margherita Bruttini, Agata Burgio, Aurora Budano, Giorgia Cancellara, Andrea Carbotti, Alessandro Canova, Ludovica Carrasi, Clara Carrera, Gabriel Castano, Edoardo Cavazzuti, Carlotta Cencic, Gabriele Cerrato, Matthieu Chiagano, Chiara Chicconi, Virginia Cibeo, Valentina Ciardullo, Lucia Ciolino, Lorenzo Cioni, Giulia Ciotti, Francesco Collovà, Chiara Colucci, Siria Comisso, Maria Comparini, Leonardo Conti, Alex Corsi, Ilenia Crivaro, Ilaria Curti, Andrea De Luca, Ilaria del Grande, Giulia De Matteis, Emilia Del Campo, Alessia De Luca, Dalila De Simone, Lisa Del Magno, Eleonora del Nero, Paola Del Piccolo, Giorgia Della Maestra, Francesco Manuel Carlo Dettori, Michela Di Campli, Helena Di Paolo, Vittoria di Stefano Alice Diblio, Alexia Dinescu, Michela Dolci, Michele Domenicucci, Simone Egitto, Sofia Esposito, Edith Ezukuse.

Project sponsored by the Department of Sociology and Economic Law (University of Bologna)

creative materials